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Comparison of woods

  • Ash, white, O
  • Beech, German, C
  • Beech, American, C
  • Cherry, American, C
  • Oak, red, northern USA, O
  • Oak, white, American, O
  • Walnut, American, O
  • Maple, Sugar (Hard), O

Characteristics

Open/closed grain
The nature of the grain is designated by the abbreviation C or O.

Eveness of color

The higher the number, the more even is the color of the wood.
The highest value is 10.
  Eveness of color

Surface preparation

The numbers indicate whether the wood is easy, moderately difficult or difficult to seal. Woods with a value of 10 are easiest to seal and therefore the most versatile.
  Surface preparation

Sanding/polishing

The number 10 is the highest valuation, a figure of 5 is acceptable.
  Sanding/polishing

Susceptibility to knocks

Based on yellow birch as the standard (100). All woods used for the tests had a moisture content of 12 %. The values were determined by the impact of a 50-pound hammer.
  Susceptibility to knocks

Contemporary aesthetics

A cross-section of the subjective opinions of designers and specialists when a comparison with the most visually appealing wood is made – in accordance with contemporary tastes.
  Contemporary aesthetics

Degree of hardness

Measured according to the Janka scale. Beech is harder than red oak, American cherry or birch.
  Degree of hardness